Thursday, April 9, 2015

25th Anniversary of Hubble Telescope Launch

April 22nd marks the 25th anniversary of the worlds first space telescope being launched. The Hubble telescope examines stars, galaxies, and has helped revise our knowledge about the age of the Universe. If you have ever wondered what else might be going on out there while we humans are busy with daily life, here are some informative and entertaining resources to start with:

Exploring The Solar System by Mary Kay Carson
*Winner of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Children’s Literature Award.
Although it is intended for ages 9 and up, there is plenty for adults to be interested in. This book is a fascinating mix of facts, history and hands-on activities.


Beyond The Solar System by Mary Kay Carson
·      Winner of NSTA-CBC Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12 for 2014 list
Another amazing book by Ms. Carson. Here she offers mini-biographies of famous astronomers, a time line of major events, lessons in history, more activities, and also a suggested reading list.

Martian Summer by Andrew Kessler
A humorous but quite informative perspective of working at NASA by an “average” person. Author Andrew Kessler is not a rocket scientist but he is a producer on the Discovery Channel who was allowed to shadow the Pheonix Mars Lander Mission. He explains what a control room is really like in fascinating detail.


Moon Shot : The Inside Story of America’s Apollo Moon Landings by Alan Shepard

Author Alan Shepard was one of the original Mercury astronauts.  In this exciting true story, he teams up with another astronaut and two veteran space reporters for a first hand account of the program’s early days.

It's hard to believe, but most teens and people in their early twenties don't remember Americans walking on the moon. This book, written lovingly by two of the most respected astronauts in U.S. history, will remedy that…expect much demand”- Booklist

For more information on the Hubble Telescope and for recent photos taken from it, go to:


http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/main/index.html